Photos from the Peace Bench Dedication


Bill Lincoln Peace Bench Dedication Reception

After the dedication of the Peace Bench we met at the Tacoma Yacht Club for a reception. Below is a video of the event. The event was on March 20, 2022.



A Request from LCS Refugee Response

We need your help. You have been following along with us throughout the Afghan refugee crisis. To date, we have welcomed over 620 to the LCS Northwest family. With so many arrivals in a short period of time, we are experiencing unanticipated needs in all three of our resettlement locations. Our community partners resources are unable to meet all of our clients’ needs.”

Read more about their specific needs here: https://api.neonemails.com/emails/content/LwMmK9Ot0lyn2oMygHnY1L6BeZfrb7O0U5bWzGI-HNQ=



Project Peace Bench

The purpose of this project is to recognize and encourage peacemakers in the greater Tacoma area through the manufacture and installment of a “Peace Bench” — a TANGIBLE symbol of dialog and diplomacy, a place where people can meet, connect, and communicate with each other. The Peace Bench will be situated in a peaceful serene location alongside the shores of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington (the Waterwalk at Point Ruston), and it will be dedicated in honor of and in memory of internationally known peacemaker, mediator, negotiator, trainer, conflict resolution guide, and long-time Tacoma resident William F. Lincoln.

 

Bill Lincoln, 1940-2020

Bill Lincoln was the 2006 Greater Tacoma Peace Prize Laureate, and he had been a member of the GTPP Board of Directors from 2015 until his unexpected death in March of 2020. Bill knew that peace begins with talking; “Let’s have a chat” was one of his standard opening lines to bring people of diverse and divergent opinions together. As Nelson Mandela said, “The best weapon is to sit down and talk.” The Peace Bench pays tribute to Bill’s efforts to bring people together to talk and make peace, to find effective resolutions for conflict. Widely acclaimed as a practitioner of negotiation and mediation, Bill found himself in diverse, critical, and often highly volatile scenarios involving international, governmental, private, community, and environmental sectors.

Bill loved Tacoma and was extremely proud of the progress the city had made since he arrived in 1984. He enjoyed walks along Ruston Way, and eventually, along the new Waterwalk at Point Ruston. When guests visited, they were treated to a “Sunday Drive” with Bill, during which he inspected and espoused upon the many construction sites at the University of Washington and the Museum District, as well as Ruston Way all the way to and through Point Defiance.

Description of Project

The bench, a “cleat bench”, will be manufactured by the Port Townsend Foundry, which uses 35% recycled sand in the manufacture of a line of concrete cleat benches. (See photos of cleat benches below.) This bench style was chosen because of the symbolism of its slightly curved shape and narrow ends, drawing those who sit on it closer together and insinuating that they should sit in the middle.

Timeline

The installation and dedication of the bench will take place in the Spring of 2022.

THANK YOU! to Kiwanis Club of Tacoma and to Loren Cohen and the team at Point Ruston (McBride-Cohen Management Group) for their assistance and generosity with this project.

It is the hope of the GTPP that the Peace Bench will be identified as the place to come where one can find not only the inner peace that comes when one has a beautiful quiet place for meditation and reflection, but also the peace that comes when two people “Have a Chat” and work out a knotty problem together.


Marilyn Kimmerling – 2020/2021 GTPP Laureate

Marilyn Kimmerling, 2020 Greater Tacoma Peace Prize Laureate

Recognizing the importance of both global human rights and climate justice, the Board of Directors of the Greater Tacoma Peace Prize (GTPP) proudly announces the selection of Marilyn Kimmerling as the 2020 GTPP Laureate.

Ms. Kimmerling believes in and works for worker rights, minority rights, human rights and finding peaceful solutions to conflict.  Since climate change is already resulting in mass migrations and conflicts over land and resources, her work has grown to include climate justice.

Marilyn has been a community activist since the mid 1990’s. Two organizations where she had great impact were Jobs with Justice, where she served a term as Chair, and United for Peace of Pierce County where she was one of the major organizers.

Kimmerling is one of the founding members of the Tacoma chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace, as well as a member of 350 Tacoma and an active associate-member of Veterans for Peace. In 2017, she co-founded the current Tacoma branch of the Industrial Workers of the World, and she is currently active with the Save the Wetlands Behind TCC campaign.  She is the chief organizer and writer of material for the “Raging Grannies” and their myriad performances.  She is President of Radio Tacoma, having worked tirelessly on the successful FCC application for an FM license, and she has continued volunteering with them for six years.  [Radio Tacoma is a low-power FM public access radio station, developed to serve Tacoma with opportunities for progressive groups, union members, minority groups, and local talent that might otherwise not be heard.] 

Believing that the proposed Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) storage/ refinery presented a regiona environmental and health threat, and having exhausted other means of opposition (for example, attending and speaking at numerous public meetings), and motivated by compassion and conviction, Marilyn and five others engaged in acts of civil disobedience, knowing they risked arrest. The risk was outweighed, they believed, by the plant’s potential danger and the treaty violation involved in its construction. They were indeed arrested, tried by jury, and exonerated on all counts.

In today’s world, the need for community activists is never-ending, and Marilyn continues to show up to build local and global community that is humane, compassionate, and just.  On her own initiative for more than ten years, she held Soup Sundays in her home, an open house for all of Tacoma, to build community. 

“Marilyn Kimmerling is the epitome of a human being working on behalf of others, and she possesses the “knowhow and do now” energy. Furthermore, she exudes a spirit of warmth and inclusiveness which is an inspiration to others. She is most worthy of the 2020 Greater Tacoma Peace Prize.”

Nancy Farrell, who nominated Ms. Kimmerling

The Greater Tacoma Peace Prize, inspired by the Nobel Peace Prize, was founded in 2005 in order to honor local peacemakers and has been formally endorsed by the Pierce County Council and the Tacoma City Council. In Norway, partners of the GTPP include the Norwegian Nobel Institute, Norwegians Worldwide (the Norse Federation), the Nansen Center for Peace and Dialog, Bjørknes College, the Oslo Center for Peace and Human Rights, the Nobel Peace Center, and the Peace Research Institute of Oslo. Recipients of the Tacoma award are honored at a Laureate Recognition Banquet in the fall and are presented with a trip to Norway in December for the Nobel Peace Prize events.

Contact: Cort Ockfen, Communications
Greater Tacoma Peace Prize
cort@tacomapeaceprize.org


Bill Lincoln, Beloved Board Member and 2006 Laureate Has Died

TACOMA– It is with great sadness that the Greater Tacoma Peace Prize Board of Directors announces the death of beloved Board member and 2006 Greater Tacoma Peace Prize Laureate William Fawcett Lincoln, who succumbed to complications from leukemia on March 21, 2020.

“Bill served our Board with great commitment. He leaves a legacy of incredible training acumen, conflict resolution, and passion for justice recognized by all of us, as fellow colleagues who came to know him for his negotiation skills and passion for the cause of peace.” – Thomas Heavey, GTPP Founder

Bill was a revered and treasured member of the Board of Directors of the Greater Tacoma Peace Prize, and was one of the early laureates (2006 – along with Polly Davis and Dawn Hooper), recognized for his work at the Conflict Resolution, Research and Resource Institute (CRI).The mission of CRI was to teach and practice the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict in the community, the nation and the world. Just a few examples of their work include the following:

William Fawcett Lincoln (1940-2020)
Settling of a dispute between community, city and natural resources and wildlife representatives in the upper Kittitas County here in Washington state
Collaborative negotiations, training and mediation education for the Central American region and key groups of the population in San Jose, Costa Rica
Development of the Sudan-American Program for Peace (S-APP) in association with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Sudan Council of Churches
Practical experience in negotiation and facilitation on a project with the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights in Warsaw, Poland
Long-term collaboration on the subjects of conflict prevention, management and resolution with organizations like the Russian-American Program on Conflictology at the University of St. Petersburg, Russia
Many years of instruction in Strategic Negotiations at the Federal Executive Institute in Charlottesville, VA and at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA.


In 2004, Mr. Lincoln received the Annual Award of Excellence by the International Academy of Mediators. Bill has been recognized as a pioneer in mediation and negotiation theory and practice. He was a federal commissioner who helped found the United States Institute of Peace, he had extensive experience working in hot spots – Wounded Knee, Walpole Prison, with the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, the URNG in Guatemala in preparation for the UN-sanctioned peace talks and with warlords in Afghanistan. Bill is a co-founder of the Russian-American Programs for Peace which started the first graduate program in conflict resolution in Russia.

Many practitioners in our region have been trained by Bill whether as members of his early mediation training programs at Antioch, or through the State of Washington Career Executive Programs or through the Pierce County Dispute Resolution Center of which he was a founder. He was also involved in training negotiators with the United Nations food safety program.

In the past five years, Bill devoted much of his time, energy, and support to the Greater Tacoma Peace Prize, while also teaching Strategic Negotiations as Senior Lecturer at the Naval Postgraduate School and the Federal Executive Institute. He was passionate about the mission of GTPP – to recognize and honor Peacemakers in the local community. First awarded in 2005 during the Centennial celebration of Norway’s independence, the award has its roots in Norwegian-American culture. Laureates of the Peace Prize are given a banquet in their honor, a medallion, a unique piece of locally made glass art, and a trip for two to Oslo, Norway to attend the festivities surrounding the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Peace.

Bill lived his life deeply and with intent. Our sympathies are extended to partner, his children and extended family (to whom Bill was devoted), and all who knew and loved him. His presence, intellect, and tremendous dedication to make the world a better, kinder and more understanding place will be deeply missed.

When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, the world will know Peace. (Jimi Hendrix)

Contact

Greater Tacoma Peace Prize
Thomas Heavey tom@tacomapeaceprize.org

253-686-8691


Federal Executive Institute: Remembering Bill Lincoln

By Colin Gwin, LDS 423

“Negotiating a peaceful transfer of power between the Sandinistas and the National Opposition Union in Nicaragua in early 1990 was not a sit-down job. Government records had been systematically destroyed, bribes payed, and laws broken. But change was in the air, and if two sides were at the table—no matter how acrimonious the relations—then both of them had something in common.

Negotiating a pause in the 1964 Rochester race riots, to allow firefighters in to try to save the neighborhoods, wasn’t really a sit-down job either. From Afghanistan to Wounded Knee, Bill Lincoln often found himself an interesting footnote to some of the world’s most significant conflicts, and he probably liked it that way: His first lesson to potential mediators was, “Don’t make it about you.”

Yet that is where Bill found himself—the center of attention, sitting comfortably in front of a class at FEI in 2016, working through his Strategic Negotiation lesson plan and offering tales of the negotiations that almost went bad—tales that made more than a few students look around in disbelief… “

Read the entire post on FEI’s website here: https://www.feiaa.org/page/020April20-08-remember